Matric Pass Requirements

Matric resultsHow are my Grade 12 Results calculated?

25% Internal School Based Assessment (SBA) (the mark given to you by your school) and 75% External Exam (Finals) – except for LO, which is 100% Internal Assessment. But, your SBA only counts if it is within 10% of your Final Exam marks. If it is 10% higher or lower than your exam mark, then only your Final Exam marks count. This is good news if you’ve got a low SBA…so get studying!!!

 Matric Pass Calculator

If you aren’t one to read and wondering if you failed or passed Matric, follow this link and your type of Matric pass will be worked out for you!

What are the Minimum Requirements for the different NSC Passes?

It is compulsory to pass your Home Language (usually English) with at least 40%. If you do not get at least 40% for your Home Language, you will fail matric.

NSC Pass:

A minimum of 40% for 3 subjects (one of which must be your Home Language) and at least 30% for 3 other subjects. You can fail your First Additional Language (usually Afrikaans) and still pass, provided your overall average is above 33 1/3 %. An NSC Pass will not enable you to study at any institution of higher learning. You need to aim higher!

* For all the types of passes that follow, a minimum of 40% for your Home Language and a minimum of 30% for your First Additional Language  is required.

Higher Certificate Pass:

A minimum 40% for 3 subjects (one of which must be a Home Language), a minimum of 30% for a further 3 subjects, and fail (less than 30%) a 7th subject. You may not fail your First Additional Language. IMPORTANT: Even if you get 6 A’s, but fail your 7th subject (get less that 30% for it), you will only achieve a Higher Certificate Pass!

Diploma Pass:

A minimum of 40% for 4 subjects (one of which must be a Home Language), and a minimum of 30% for the other 3 subjects. IMPORTANT: You cannot fail any subject (get a final mark of less than 30%)!

Bachelor’s Pass:

A minimum of 50% for 4 subjects, and a minimum of 30% for the other 3 subjects (you must achieve a minimum of 40% for a Home Language and a minimum of 30% for your First Additional Language). IMPORTANT: You cannot fail any subject (get a final mark of less than 30%)!

What do the different NSC Passes mean for my future?

The Higher Certificate Pass means that you have passed matric, great! However, you cannot study further at a University of Technology or University with those marks. But if it is your dream to go to a University or University of Technology, you will be able to enrole for “bridging courses”. Bridging courses, offered by accredited FET Colleges, will allow you to upgrade your matric results, so that you can meet the minimum requirements needed to get into the degree or diploma course that you want to study. If you want to study further, but do not want to go the bridging course route, you can get great qualifications at Beauty Schools, Chef Schools, IT Colleges and many more. If you want to go straight into the world of work right after matric; your Higher Certificate Pass does qualify you to take part in “in house training” at casinos, hotels, cruise ships, etc. Or you can do more physical or administrative work.

The Diploma Pass means that you have passed matric and can study at a University of Technology straight away, but not a University. Like the Higher Certificate Pass, you can upgrade your matric by taking bridging courses, so that you can meet the minimum requirements needed to get into the course you want to study. There are many great qualifications that are offered by Universities of Technology, called diplomas. Some of these qualifications are only  available form Universities of Technology, like becoming a Chiropractor. Since Universities of Technology focus on the practical side of learning, you will usually find that a diploma will take less time to study, but include a much larger practical component. That is why there is a general perception that it is “easier” to get a diploma than a degree (University qualification), and this can lead to University of Technology graduates being overlooked if they are competing with University graduates for the same job. However, in some cases, employers may consider your extra practical experience to be an advantage – it all depends on the line of work that you want to go into.

The Bachelor’s Pass is the best possible pass level you can achieve, and it qualifies you to study at any tertiary institution in South Africa, as long as you have met the requirements for that particular degree or diploma. It is always a good idea to get a degree behind your name; even if you don’t end up working in the field that you studied. Having that qualification gives you extra credibility, because you have proven that you can handle the work load and intellectual challenges of completing a University degree. That said, we do not recommend that you study a degree that every Tom, Dick and Harry has done, unless you are 100% sure that you will be able to rise to the top. This is because there are just not enough jobs available to employ all of the general BA and BSocSci graduates. We recommend that when you get an idea about what you want to study; do a little research about the job security, demand, and work availability in that field, so that you can make an educated decision about your future.

 

Government References (these government statements are LONG and we are not recommending that you read through them – they are included here for your peace of mind)

Department of Basic Education: The National Senior Certificate

Norms and Standards for the Release of the Public Examination Results

Comments

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37 thoughts on “Matric Pass Requirements”

  1. In matric, if you get a code 4 term 1, code 4 term 2 , code 3 term 3 but you fail (code 1) last term finals , what will be ur final code come january?

  2. hi I would like to no I matriculated in 2009 with 7 subjects and last year decided to go to night school so I wrote ASC Exams this year I saw on da certificate you mus have 6 subjects all together can I let 1 subject fall away to get my matric and can I use life orientation as a passed subject cause I passed english,geography,life science,afrikaans and life orientation so if I fail 1 can I still pass and let the 7th one fall away.

  3. Hi I have checked with the department of education today and they say the rule

    “SBA only counts if it is within 10% of your Final Exam marks. If it is 10% higher or lower than your exam mark, then only your Final Exam marks count”

    is for the whole school and not per individual candidate. Gosh I am so confused now, I asked them how to find out if my school qualified for this or not, no answer yet.

  4. Hi is this true for the CASS mark for all subjects? If I get 10% higher will that definitely be the mark I receive on my final report?

      1. What if i get More than 60% in my exam marks but less marks with Cass(less than 15%)?will my Cass mark be used?

  5. two percent thats five marks makes me suffer for the rest of my life.
    and now i have been doing something that i dont like here at university of Tshwane *feeling bad*

  6. I have a NSC Diploma pass.. When I tried registering for an extended course at the NWU Mafikeng campus my application was rejected. I still don’t understand why because I thought extended courses where bridging courses for degrees and my aps score meets the requirements. Anyone with answers please help..

  7. Lol iam so scared of failing afrikaans its just this one subject that’s bringing me down,I want to join the police next year and they require matric if I do happen to fail afrikaans I will still get in right?

    1. You will pass matric. But do your best to pass everything, you will need the best results possible to put yourself above the rest :)

  8. I’m w was writing a old syllabus matric exam I passed both the languages bt for the other 4 subject I got less then 30% so wha I want to know is that I passed of failed.

    1. Hi Ncamisile. You would have failed that exam, but keep in mind that the current syllabus will be easier than the old ones. Good luck!

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